A Return to the Sea

My name is Antonio. I am a child of the great expanse.

"One's reach should exceed one's grasp else what is a heaven for?"

ritabentonmusiclibrary:

A compendium: or, Introduction to practical musick. In five parts.

Teaching … 1. The rudiments of song. 2. The principles of composition. 3. The use of discords. 4. The form of figurate descant. 5. The contrivance of cannon.

Simpson, Christopher, d. 1669. 
 
The 5th ed. with additions: much more correct than any former, the examples being put in the most useful cliffs …

London, Printed by W. P. for J. Young, 1714.
Description  

7 p. l., 144 p. front. (port.) illus. (music) tables. 18 cm.

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This introductory music text, in a fifth edition that is “much more correct than any former”, caught my eye for a couple of reasons.

First, the book starts with a poem titled “To all lovers of harmony” and I thought it was about time that someone gave some credit to those “whose eternal arms puts chaos into concord.” Let’s hear it for the theorists! The poem concludes with some choice words for those who hate music (see 2nd image above).

Second, the illustrations of musical concepts are impressive, both in terms of their clarity and simplicity. Musical concepts aren’t always the easiest to communicate, even with visual aids. As a librarian, I especially appreciate the Venn diagram nature of the cantus/tenor/bassus ladder diagram.

And lastly, there’s the final paragraph that proves musicians have been spouting the same advice for at least 300+ years - practice, practice, PRACTICE!

If you’d like to see the item in its entirety, it’s available in several editions on archive.org:

Sixth edition (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill):

http://archive.org/details/compendiumorintrsimp

Eighth edition (National Library of Scotland):

http://www.archive.org/details/compendiumorintr00simp

(via no-tritones-for-you)

Beautiful tea, beautiful brunch, beautiful friendship. #loljk #fake #badbitches #databreach2014 #13dollaryogurt #shouldagonetoboomnoodle #fuckitall #isthatpatti? #hipatti #nicetomeetyou #imactuallyreallycool @nichole_abbey  (at Lost Lake Cafe & Lounge)

Beautiful tea, beautiful brunch, beautiful friendship. #loljk #fake #badbitches #databreach2014 #13dollaryogurt #shouldagonetoboomnoodle #fuckitall #isthatpatti? #hipatti #nicetomeetyou #imactuallyreallycool @nichole_abbey (at Lost Lake Cafe & Lounge)

nyphil:

Lisa Batiashvili, mid-Brahms Thursday night. See her Sat. or Tue. (Photo: Chris Lee) (at Avery Fisher Hall)

nyphil:

Lisa Batiashvili, mid-Brahms Thursday night. See her Sat. or Tue. (Photo: Chris Lee) (at Avery Fisher Hall)

koolkevk:

Steal her Look: Deandra the New Girl

  • White Sleeveless Dress - $170
  • Cybernetic Arm Prosthetic - $11,000
I can c ur halo (halo halo)  (at Cherry Street Coffee House)

I can c ur halo (halo halo) (at Cherry Street Coffee House)

fashionsfromhistory:


La Capresses des Colonies
Charles-Henri-Joseph Cordier
1861

In his unpublished memoirs Charles Cordier cites the law of April 27, 1848 that abolished slavery in France and its colonies, writing: “My art incorporated the reality of a whole new subject, the revolt against slavery and the birth of anthropology.” In pioneering ethnography as a subject for sculpture in the nineteenth century, Cordier aimed to illustrate what he described as “the idea of the universality of beauty.” His busts often paired couples of the opposite sex but of the same race. This rare instance of matched busts of women was desired by the purchaser, a gaming club in Marseilles, that also commissioned the sumptuous Second-Empire pedestals from Cordier. 
The busts revel in the period taste for polychromy in sculpture, an international phenomenon sparked by artistic debates about the painting of ancient statuary and inspired by ancient Roman and Renaissance sculpture composed of variously colored marbles. On a trip to Algeria in 1856 Cordier discovered onyx deposits in recently reopened ancient quarries and began to use the stone in busts such as these. He ingeniously fitted enameled bronze heads into the vibrantly patterned stone, creating exciting though costly representations of Africans that appealed to the highest levels of European society. (MET)

MET

fashionsfromhistory:

La Capresses des Colonies

Charles-Henri-Joseph Cordier

1861

In his unpublished memoirs Charles Cordier cites the law of April 27, 1848 that abolished slavery in France and its colonies, writing: “My art incorporated the reality of a whole new subject, the revolt against slavery and the birth of anthropology.” In pioneering ethnography as a subject for sculpture in the nineteenth century, Cordier aimed to illustrate what he described as “the idea of the universality of beauty.” His busts often paired couples of the opposite sex but of the same race. This rare instance of matched busts of women was desired by the purchaser, a gaming club in Marseilles, that also commissioned the sumptuous Second-Empire pedestals from Cordier. 

The busts revel in the period taste for polychromy in sculpture, an international phenomenon sparked by artistic debates about the painting of ancient statuary and inspired by ancient Roman and Renaissance sculpture composed of variously colored marbles. On a trip to Algeria in 1856 Cordier discovered onyx deposits in recently reopened ancient quarries and began to use the stone in busts such as these. He ingeniously fitted enameled bronze heads into the vibrantly patterned stone, creating exciting though costly representations of Africans that appealed to the highest levels of European society. (MET)

MET

(via seattleinsomnia)

Best of luck to my new friend Jenny as she starts school @seattleu and continues to try to make drinks at @starbucks @janie.bug #tobeapartner #jennyandannie

Best of luck to my new friend Jenny as she starts school @seattleu and continues to try to make drinks at @starbucks @janie.bug #tobeapartner #jennyandannie